The ATR-72 is a twin-engine turboprop short-haul regional airliner built by the Franco-Italian aircraft manufacturer ATR. A stretched variant of the ATR-42, the aircraft seats up to 74 passengers in a single-class configuration, and is operated by a two-pilot crew.

Variants[edit | edit source]

ATR-72-100[edit | edit source]

Two sub-types were marketed as the 100 series (−100).

  • ATR-72-101: Initial production variant with front and rear passenger doors, powered by two PW124B engines and certified in September 1989.
  • ATR-72-102: Initial production variant with a front cargo door and a rear passenger door, powered by two PW124B engines and certified in December 1989.

ATR-72-200[edit | edit source]

Two sub-types were marketed as the 200 series (−200). The −200 was the original production version, powered by Pratt & Whitney Canada PW124B engines rated at 2,400 shp (1,800 kW).

  • ATR-72-201: Higher maximum take-off weight variant of the −101, a PW124B-powered variant certified in September 1989.
  • ATR-72-202: Higher maximum take-off weight variant of the −102, a PW124B-powered variant certified in December 1989.

ATR-72-210[edit | edit source]

Two sub-types were marketed as the 210 series (−210): the −211 (and with an enlarged cargo door, called the −212) is a −200 with PW127 engines producing 2,750 shp (2,050 kW) each for improved performance in hot and high-altitude conditions. The sub-types differ in the type of doors and emergency exits.

  • ATR-72-211: PW127-powered variant certified in December 1992.
  • ATR-72-212: PW127-powered variant certified in December 1992.

ATR-72-212A[edit | edit source]

Certified in January 1997 and fitted with either PW127F or PW127M engines, the −212A is an upgraded version of the −210 using six-bladed propellers on otherwise identical PW127F engines. Other improvements include higher maximum weights and superior performance, as well as greater automation of power management to ease pilot workload.

  • ATR-72-500: Initial marketing name for the ATR 72-212A.
  • ATR-72-600: Marketing name for ATR 72-212A with different equipment fit. The −600 series aircraft was announced in October 2007; the first deliveries were planned for the second half of 2010. The prototype ATR 72–600 first flew on 24 July 2009; it had been converted from an ATR 72–500. The ATR 72–600 features several improvements. It is powered by the new PW127M engines, which enable a 5% increase in takeoff power via a "boost function" used only when called for by takeoff conditions. The flight deck features five wide LCD screens (improving on the EFIS of earlier versions). A multi-purpose computer (MPC) aims at increasing flight safety and operational capabilities, and new Thales-made avionics provide Required Navigation Performance (RNP) capabilities. It also features lighter seats and larger overhead baggage bins. In December 2015, the EASA approved a new high-density seating layout, raising the maximum capacity from 74 to 78 seats.

Other variants[edit | edit source]

  • Cargo: Bulk Freighter (tube versions) and ULD Freighter (Large Cargo Door). ATR unveiled a large cargo door modification for all ATR 72 at Farnborough 2002, coupled with a dedicated cargo conversion. FedEx, DHL, and UPS all operate the type.
  • ATR-72-600F: Freighter variant of the -600, November 8th 2017 launch with thirty firm orders from FedEx plus twenty options. The first should be delivered in 2020.
  • P-72A ASW: The ATR 72 ASW integrates the ATR 42 MP (Maritime Patrol) mission system with identical on-board equipment, but with additional anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capabilities. A variant of the −500 (itself a version of the maritime patrol model of the ATR 42–500) is also in production. For the ASW and ASuW missions, it is armed with a pod-mounted machine gun, lightweight aerial torpedoes, anti-surface missiles, and depth charges. They are equipped with the Thales AMASCOS (Airborne Maritime Situation and Control System) surveillance system as well as electronic warfare and reconnaissance systems, enabling the type to perform maritime search and rescue duties.
  • Corporate:' A VIP version of the −500 is available with a luxury interior for executive or corporate transport.
  • ATR-82: During the mid-1980s, the company investigated a 78-seat derivative of the ATR 72. This would have been powered by two Rolls Royce TP2100 turboprops (turbofans were also studied for a time) and would have had a cruising speed as high as 330kt. The ATR-82 project (as it was dubbed) was suspended when AI(R) was formed in early 1996.
  • ATR Quick Change: This proposed version targeted the increasing demand of worldwide cargo and express mail markets, where the aim is to allow operators to supplement their passengers flights with freighter flights. In Quick Change configuration, the smoke detector is equipped alongside other modifications required in order to meet the certification for full freight operations. The aircraft was equipped with a larger cargo door (1.27 m [50 in] wide and 1.52 m [60 in] high) and low door-sill height of an average 1.2 m (4 ft), facilitating containerized freight loading. It takes 30 minutes to convert the aircraft on ATR 42, while for ATR 72, it takes 45 minutes. Each optimized container has 2.8 m3 (99 cu ft) of usable volume and maximum payload is 435 kg (960 lb).

Users[edit | edit source]

See Also[edit | edit source]

Related Development[edit | edit source]

Comparable Aircraft[edit | edit source]

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.